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What Is SPF Check?

Posted on March 28th, 2013 by Boyana Peeva in WebSitePulse News

EmailSPF or Sender Policy Framework is a system that authenticates and identifies servers that your domain can use to send mail. The aim is to ensure that unauthorized spammers and cyber criminals do not send messages to recipients that supposedly come from your domain. With SPF in place, recipients can check the available records to determine whether the received emails really originated from an authorized mail server. Keep reading to learn more about the sender policy framework.

SPF Versus Sender ID

Contrary to popular belief, SPF and sender ID are quite different. The confusion stems from the fact that both use the same policy records syntax, validate e-mail sender addresses, and publish policy records in DNS. However, this is where the similarity ends. SPF validates two parts of the e-mail sender’s address: the MAIL FROM address and the HELO domain. You can find this information by checking the records published by domain owners. It is important to note that both the HELO domain and the MAIL FROM are part of the SMTP protocol. On the other hand, sender ID is a Microsoft protocol that validates a single field of the e-mail address header. The header to validate depends on the choice made by the Purported Responsible Address (PRA) algorithm.

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Understanding Responsive Website Design

Posted on March 27th, 2013 by Allie Cooper in Guest Posts

Responsive web designAs more people use mobile devices, the need for your website to have a responsive design becomes a necessity. What’s a mobile responsive design? You might ask. It’s the theme including layout and content that adapts to the size of the screen. So, if you will try to visit Facebook on your iPhone’s Safari or Google Chrome browser, you’ll notice that the content shifts to fit the display of your device’s screen.

Since smartphones and tablets have smaller screens than laptops and PCs, websites without responsive design may take a longer time to load considering it’s made up of Flash images, longer content and full-HD background. If your website doesn’t have a responsive design, then you are losing a lot of clients. In fact, 60 percent of mobile users will only wait three seconds for a page to load. The study also revealed that 43 percent of the respondents said they are unlikely to return to a slow loading site. So far, 77 percent of the mobile sites take more than five seconds to load, so make sure you know how to measure your website’s response time.

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What Is 5xx Status Code?

Posted on March 26th, 2013 by Boyana Peeva in Tech

Ooops, 500 internal server errorWhen a web server receives a request, it returns an HTTP (Hypertext Transfer Protocol) status code in response to the request. An HTTP request may fail as a result of a network error or when the web server experiences problems executing a request. Consequently, the server returns a corresponding HTTP status code to describe the condition of the request. The status codes help in identifying the cause of the problem when a web resource fails to load properly.

The 5xx codes are Server Error codes indicating that an error has occurred while processing the client’s request.

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What is 4xx Status Code?

Posted on March 22nd, 2013 by Boyana Peeva in Tech

404 not foundThe 4xx HTTP status codes are purposed to indicate what you or your client agent may have done wrong. In any case, your client agent is required to display the error to you especially when it is related to your actions. When a HEAD request is submitted, the server does not display the error code. Instead, it acts on the request.

400 - Bad Request

This is normally due to erred syntax or inclusion of characters that the server would not understand. This request will be displayed for your purposeful response.

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What Is 3xx HTTP Status Code?

Posted on March 20th, 2013 by Boyana Peeva in Tech

300 HTTP status codesThe 3xx HTTP status codes are a class of status codes that indicate that further action by you may be required to get to the destination URL. Sometimes the web client may take some action on your behalf  if the consecutive request on the target URL is characterized by HEAD or GET. In the case where 5 consecutive URI's are all unavailable, the process is halted by most user agents to prevent a vicious cycle of redirection.

Redirect status codes are important to you because locations on the Internet are always changing, and sometimes the actions you take on the Internet may require a redirect to a new location. The request that your user agent makes may also require to return to the original URI after completing a certain step in the process. Using such codes, the web server and the user agent communicate to take you to other locations, either automatically - in mitigating errors or relocations, or basically - in responding to actionable requests.

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